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People Change: Why Clean Slate Matters

America has 5% of the world’s total population by 25% of the world’s prisoners. 65 million people have a criminal record in the United States. Having a criminal conviction can trigger over 900 civil barriers including barriers to employment, housing and education.
At our July 12th Clean Slate Clinic we set up a camera and asked formerly incarcerated people to share their stories. This is what they told us.

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New Webinar: 8 Steps for Paying for College – How to Navigate the Minefield of Student Loans

Thursday, August 14 at 2:00 PM ET / 11:00 AM PT
This webinar is completely free and registrants will receive a recorded video of the presentation!

Register Now!


Could you use some help in coming up with a plan to pay for your, or your child’s, college education?

The debate over the value of a college education vs. the out of control costs of attending college rages on. Regardless of which side of the discussion you are on, the cost of a college education in this country is creating a huge economic divide and contributing to inescapable, long-term financial problems for students, graduates, families and the economy.

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Immigration influx leads to federal and local policy changes

Sparked by a surge in Central American migrants fleeing their homes due to poverty and violence, protests near San Diego calling to deport immigrants reignited the debate surrounding immigration policy. In one example, 100 protesters sought to turn back buses of immigrants heading to a Border Patrol …

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Deconstructing “the Good Old Days” in Canada

I often hear positive references to the “good old days” as individuals reflect on how much better things were in the past, and yet, as a visible minority female immigrant, I cannot help but consider how much worse my experience would have been in the “good old days” given the strides that have been made with anti-oppressive practice approaches. 

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Reeta Wolfsohn to Speak at the NASW National Conference and Financial Empowerment Symposium

Reeta Wolfsohn, CMSW, founder of Center for Financial Social Work, will be in the nation’s capital from July 23rd through July 27th to keynote and speak at two national events.

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Step 1 In Landing That Job: Take Inventory

Whether it’s looking for a job because you are out of work, or looking for a promotion, I don’t think you can get better initial advice than to take an inventory and KNOW yourself.

In any interview process where a job is up for competition the overall point of an interview is the employer, (as represented by their interviewer), is getting to know you better so they can ultimately decide if what you have to offer will fulfill their current and/or future needs.

So what is ‘knowing yourself’ all about?

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When School’s Out, Hungry Kids Miss their Meals

For many American children, summer is about barbecues, corn on the cob, watermelon, and drippy ice cream cones. For others, it’s about hunger.

During the school year, children from low-income families qualify for federally-funded National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and sometimes the School Breakfast Program through their public schools. Under these programs, a family of four earning less than $31,005 can receive free meals and those earning under $44,123 receive reduced price meals. These programs feed twenty-one million children at school and give their families’ budgets a break. During the summer, children living in areas where the majority of school children qualify for school lunches are eligible to receive meals through NSLP as well as the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). Why then did only one in seven eligible children receive meals through these programs last summer and what toll is food insecurity taking on their well-being?

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Daryl Atkinson Receives White House Champion of Change Award

White House Honors Champion of Change Daryl Atkinson
On Monday, June 30, 2014 the White House honored local “Champions of Change” who are doing extraordinary work to facilitate employment opportunities for individuals formerly involved in the justice system.  Daryl V. Atkinson, an attorney with the Southern Coalition for Social Justice, was the only North Carolina-based recipient.

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The Personal Impact of Supreme Court Decisions

It’s been a tough week for women. The Supreme Court unanimously struck down the buffer zone around clinics providing abortions, making it easier for protesters to harass those entering the clinic. Then, the men of the Court voted in favor of private companies withholding health care from women if they don’t agree with it—even though the company in question, Hobby Lobby, invests in and profits from Pfizer, which manufactures contraceptives. It has been a strange month for a social justice advocate such as myself. I’ve rejoiced as states, one by one, recognize my brothers and sisters in same-sex marriages and in private moments I realize that as a straight woman, with outstanding health complications, this is also a time of great strife that has lead to two steps backward without any steps forward.

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The Spider and the Wasp: A Book Review

If you ever read a passage from a book and said, “This! I’ve had this, I know this, this is exactly how I felt!”, then you understand how it was to read The Spider and the Wasp, by Matt Haarington. When I first agreed to review the memoir, I figured that Matt’s dry humor and unique perspective would pro …

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